An introduction to wine body

There are many aspects that make up wine body. For a person new to wine tasting, Adam Richard Seger shares that understanding the body will help a wine lover describe what they enjoyed most in their drink. Basically, when one discusses wine body, they are detailing its weight in the palate.

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According to the Master Sommelier, the body can be light, medium, or full. The alcohol level is the major factor that makes up the body more than the tannins and the sugar content. The higher the content, the heavier it will feel in the palate. Light-bodied wines have under 12.5% alcohol content and are described as sharp, zesty, floral, and even thin. These kinds of wines are also lighter in color. Pinot Noir, Gamay, Chenin Blanc, and Riesling are some examples. Wine tasters often describe these wines as juicy and moderate. Many also consider this kind of wine to be the best partner for food.

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When it comes to medium-bodied wines, sommeliers like Adam Richard Seger consider these as wines that have 12.5% to 13.5% alcohol content. Wines like Pinot Blanc, Cabernet Franc, Sangiovese, and Nebbiolo belong to this category. When the alcohol content goes beyond 13.5%, this is when a wine is considered full-bodied. These are usually the cocktail wines that are lush and bold. Some tasters often describe the taste as oily and rich. Malbec, Tannat, and Syrah are known for being full-bodied wines. Unlike light or medium-bodied wines, these wines are usually not paired with food, as wine lovers believe that these can be served on their own.

Farm-to-bar pioneer Adam Richard Seger is an alumnus of Cornell Hotel School, Michelin-Starred restaurants Chez Julien in Strasbourg, TRU in Chicago, and The French Laundry in Napa Valley. For interesting reads on food and drink, visit this blog.

Five important terms for wine lovers

Good wine makes a meal more special. It can also make a celebration more meaningful. Or for those who enjoy drinking their wine alone or with a small group, a glass can bring pleasure after a long day. Adam Richard Seger, farm-to-bar pioneer and accredited Advanced Sommelier from The Court of Master Sommeliers, shares five important terms for wine lovers.

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1. Body

A wine’s body is a product of fermentation. This means that the amount of sugar and yeast produces the alcohol. This could also mean the weight of the wine in a taster’s palate. Wine with higher alcohol or sugar might have a fuller body. When looking for wine, one can describe what they like as light, medium, or full-bodied.

2. Terroir

This is a French word for describing the natural factors involved in producing wine, such as soil quality, climate, the slope of the vineyard, topography, and the vine’s age. Adam Richard Seger shares that more flavorful wines usually come from steeper slopes, rougher soil, and older vines.

3. Finish

There is a taste and a sensation that settles in the mouth after drinking wine. Finish can be classified as sweet, tart, bitter, smoky, and many others. When looking for wine, it might be helpful to note the finish to describe it to the sommelier. Being familiar with other finishes will also allow wine lovers to explore more types of the drink.

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4.Tannin

Adam Richard Seger explains that the color in red wines comes from tannin or the bitter skin. Tannins settle with age, and the wine becomes softer, or more decant after or more years. For wine tastings, tannins matter as they can encompass the dryness and bitterness of the wine. However, this term is more common with red wine.

5. Vintage

This is the term used for a particular year when the wine was harvested and produced. For the white wines, the color becomes darker and becomes less bright in flavor as the years pass. Meanwhile, red wines get lighter and milder through the years.

Adam Richard Seger is a pioneer of the farm-to-bar movement. He is known for his unique approach to cocktail culture. Visit this page for similar reads.

What makes truffles expensive?

Adam Richard Seger is passionate about food and drink. At present, he oversees operations for three LUSH Food & Drink locations in Chicago and manages product development for New York-based Adya Global. In this blog, he will share some valuable information about truffles—a sought-after ingredient enjoyed by foodies worldwide. What are truffles, and what makes them expensive?

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Eighteenth-century French gastronome Brillat-Savarin called truffles “the diamonds in the kitchen” because these fungi grow in rare places and require a good environment such as the roots of oak, beech, hazel, and other similar forest trees. While truffles can be considered fungi, they grow underground, unlike mushrooms that multiply above ground. Culinary expert Adam Richard Seger says that truffles have been considered a luxury ingredient because of their earthy and garlicky aroma that affects their taste. However, the aromatic fungi are also highly perishable, which is why food connoisseurs all over the world are willing to spend thousands of dollars to get a fresh batch.

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In the past, truffle harvesters have used pigs to find the ingredient. Nowadays, there are trained dogs that can locate the fungi up to three feet underground. Various types of truffles can be found all over the world. The most famous are the white truffles found in Italy and the black truffles in France. After harvesting, truffles must be shipped to restaurants and buyers immediately to preserve their freshness. To enjoy the flavor of the truffles, they should be paired with simple dishes such as pasta, potatoes, or rice to bring out their rich flavor.

Adam Richard Seger is a pioneer of the farm-to-bar movement. He is known for his unique approach to cocktail culture. Visit this page for more information.

A beginner’s guide to appreciating the different kinds of beer

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Beer is a well-loved beverage all around the world. Taste and beverage expert Adam Richard Seger shares his knowledge about one of the oldest alcoholic beverages in this blog post. Here’s an introduction to the different kinds of beer.

IPA (India Pale Ale)

This style of ale is made with extra hops, according to the measurement of the International Bittering Units. Centuries ago, the travel from England to India lasted up to six months. Since brewing was difficult in India due to the country’s climate, the brews were made in England to withstand the long travel until the beverage reached its destination. IPA is known to have a hoppier and stronger taste. These days, a variant called Black IPA is becoming popular as it is brewed with chocolate and dark malts. Double IPA has extra alcohol (up to 10%) and extra hops content that could go up to 100 IBU.

Lager

This is the type of beer that is fermented at low temperatures. Lager comes in various varieties such as pale, amber, or dark. Compared to other types of beer, it is fermented from the bottom up. One of the most popular types of beer among consumers is pale lager. A pilsner is a type of lager that originated from the Czech Republic. Adam Richard Seger shares that Budweiser and other popular beers were modeled after the most-known European pilsners.

Saison

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This beer style has lighter alcohol content and is refreshing. Like other styles, it may taste malty or hoppy, according to the style of the brewer. A Saison was traditionally made during late fall to the early days of spring during the cooler months, which can be good for controlling fermentation. These beers are fermented with yeast from the top and use local grains and ingredients. While there are still breweries in Belgium that specialize in Saison, there are also many American brewers who make this kind of beer.

Adam Richard Seger is a pioneer of the farm-to-bar movement. He is known for his unique approach to the cocktail culture. Visit this page for more information on various drinks.

Five ways to become a better bartender

Preparing and serving drinks to customers require a variety of skills. As a professional in the hospitality, flavor, and teaching industries, Adam Richard Seger shares valuable tips to help bartenders become better at what they do.

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Be present when facing customers

This is true not just on days when the bar is not busy. Even when there are many orders, a good bartender should be attentive when communicating with customers. More than greeting them and asking for their orders and payment, a sincere smile will go a long way. When dealing with new customers, entertaining their questions will make them feel comfortable.

Secure payment after taking the order

After taking the order, it is only proper to get the customer’s payment, especially if they won’t be running a tab.

Observe cleanliness

Since the job involves handling drinks, Adam Richard Seger says that bartenders shouldn’t neglect their work area’s cleanliness. After taking a guest’s order, beverage napkins should be provided. Little spillages in front and behind the bar should also be promptly cleaned. Once a customer leaves, the area they occupied must be cleared. Lastly, bartenders should look presentable from their clothes, shoes, hair, and fingernails.

Hype the food menu




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While customers come to the bar to enjoy drinks, Adam Richard Seger says that the food menu should be excellent as well. Many customers like to eat before they drink, which is why it is good to have a menu that they can enjoy and remember. Bartenders shouldn’t be afraid to make suggestions when it comes to food.

Don’t be afraid to recommend drinks

Non-regulars might not know what they want to drink. Bartenders should be ready to give their recommendations. And if the customer chooses from these, bartenders should do their best to give them a drink they’ll enjoy.

Adam Richard Seger, CCP, is a pioneer of the farm-to-bar movement. He is known for his unique approach to cocktail culture. For more reads on the food and beverage industry, visit this page.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

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